The world of yowhatsshakin

 
 

Ever since its introduction in 1981, the L-2000 remained the mainstay in the G&L low-ender catalog. Strangely enough, they never released a 5-string version of this model while Leo was still alive, even though the 5-string L-5000 with a single Z-coil pickup got to market in late-1988. The release of the L-2500 had to wait until 1996, 5 years after Leo passed away. The one in my collection has several upgrades. First the presence of a gorgeous quilted maple Honey finished top on American Tilia (basswood) back. Second, the hard-rock maple neck, joined to the body by virtue of 6 bolts, has a ebony fingerboard. Third, the headstock is painted black and has 5 custom G&L ultra-light machines with tapered posts in a 3-2 lay-out. The electronics consists of 2 of the aforementioned MFD humbuckers with volume control and Tri-Tone active/passive controls, including mini toggle switches for pickup selection, series vs. parallel, and preamp off/on/on with high-end EQ boost. For more information on these incredibly versatile electronics, pay a visit to the G&L website and the webpage for this model:

http://www.glguitars.com/instruments/USA/basses/L2500/index.asp.

 

G&L L-2500

The story behind this bass

Year:                  2003

Serial number:    CLF29987

Neck date:         none, marked ‘2500’, ‘(EB)’, ‘NTD’, ‘BLK HD’

Body date:         NOV(?) 05 2003

Strings:              D’Addario EXL170-5SL Nickel Wound 5-string Light Super Long Scale (45-130)

When I was a teenager I played guitar in a band. But while that band never left the attic of my parent’s house, I did gig every 2 weeks playing bass in a choir band. When later on I played in a recording-only trio of 2 guitar players and a drummer, I also took care of the bass parts. The bass I used in that band had a no-brand name but I remember it to be heavy (good wood) and having a great sound (good construction). Its owner, our singer, put it up for sale but the drummer picked it up before I could. Alas. After having purchased many guitars, I deemed it necessary to balance out the collection with a mandolin and a bass. I wavered on making it fretless, but then it still would have been with ghost lines. But for ease and familiarity I went with the fretted version. And the fretless part (without the ghost lines) has been taken care of by the L-1000F w/ebony board. I do not have a dedicated bass amp but, and this is the only plug you’ll find on these pages, you can read about the nifty HA-1A on my practice amp page.